Joanne Whalley

D.O.B: Aug 25, 1961 |  Salford, Manchester, England, UK

23Credit Score

An arresting, dark-haired stunner of 1980s and 1990s continental filming, Joanne Whalley should have made far more of an impact in Hollywood than she did. She was born in Manchester, England and prodded by her parents into acting at an early age, performing in school plays and winning a recurring role at age 10 on the popular long-running British TV serial Coronation Street (1960).

Biography

An arresting, dark-haired stunner of 1980s and 1990s continental filming, Joanne Whalley should have made far more of an impact in Hollywood than she did. She was born in Manchester, England and prodded by her parents into acting at an early age, performing in school plays and winning a recurring role at age 10 on the popular long-running British TV serial Coronation Street (1960). From there she played series characters on Emmerdale (1972) and A Kind of Loving (1982), where she became known for playing crafty, precocious girls. After gaining significant TV status, she auditioned for and was accepted into Englands Royal Court Theatre, performing classical ingénue roles in such standards as The Three Sisters and earning kudos, including an Olivier nomination. The doe-eyed, beauteous Joanne was a natural for film and received some attention for playing a groupie in Pink Floyd: The Wall (1982). She went on to earn critical notice in second lead roles among some pretty heady company including Miranda Richardson and Rupert Everett in the stylish 50s period piece Dance with a Stranger (1985); Ray McAnally in the smart satirical comedy No Surrender (1985); and Anthony Hopkins in the bitter-edged social drama The Good Father (1985). She impressed as well on TV as Young Fan opposite George C. Scotts Ebenezer Scrooge in A Christmas Carol (1984), and in the superlative epic dramas Reilly: Ace of Spies (1983), Edge of Darkness (1985) and The Singing Detective (1986), earning a BAFTA nomination for Darkness. Joanne moved quickly up the ranks and top-lined her very first film as the protagonist in Screen Two: Will You Love Me Tomorrow (1987). She carried the movie beautifully as a young unstable woman leaving the security of an institution for the first time. She is fascination itself as her character grows increasingly disillusioned with the harsh realities of everyday life. Her next role as Sorsha was an extremely important one and the reasons are twofold.