Connie Stevens

D.O.B: Aug 08, 1938 |  Brooklyn, New York City, New York, USA

14Credit Score

Connie Stevens was born Concetta Rosalie Ann Ingoglia in Brooklyn, New York City, the daughter of Eleanor McGinley, a singer, and Teddy Stevens (born Peter Ingoglia), a musician. Her father was of Italian/Sicilian descent and her mother was of half Irish and half Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry.

Biography

Connie Stevens was born Concetta Rosalie Ann Ingoglia in Brooklyn, New York City, the daughter of Eleanor McGinley, a singer, and Teddy Stevens (born Peter Ingoglia), a musician. Her father was of Italian/Sicilian descent and her mother was of half Irish and half Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry. Connie was raised by grandparents when her parents (both jazz musicians) filed for divorced. She attended Catholic boarding schools in her formative years and a distinct interest in music led to her forming a vocal quartet called The Foremost which was comprised of Connie and three men. Those men later became part of The Lettermen. In Hollywood from 1953, Connie formed yet another vocal group The Three Debs while trying to break into films as an extra. Although she managed to co-star in a few mediocre teen dramas such as Young and Dangerous (1957), Eighteen and Anxious (1957), The Party Crashers (1958), and Dragstrip Riot (1958), it was comedian Jerry Lewis who set things in motion by casting the unknown starlet in his comedy Rock-a-Bye Baby (1958). Warner Bros. signed her up for their hot detective series Hawaiian Eye (1959) and she was off. As pert and pretty Cricket Blake, a slightly flaky and tomboyish singer/photographer, Connie became an instant teen idol -- trendy and undeniably appealing. A couple of record hits came her way including Sixteen Reasons and the novelty song Kookie, Kookie, Lend Me Your Comb. Connies acting talent was light and limited, however, and some attempts at adult film drama, including the title role in Susan Slade (1961), Parrish (1961), Palm Springs Weekend (1963), and Two on a Guillotine (1965) came and went.