Candice Bergen

D.O.B: May 09, 1946 |  Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, California, USA

35Credit Score

One cool, eternally classy lady, Candice Bergen was elegantly poised for trendy ice princess stardom when she first arrived on the 60s screen, but she gradually reshaped that débutante image in the 70s both on- and off-camera. A staunch, outspoken feminist with a decisive edge, she went on to take a sizable portion of these contradicting qualities to film and, most particularly, to late 80s TV.

Biography

One cool, eternally classy lady, Candice Bergen was elegantly poised for trendy ice princess stardom when she first arrived on the 60s screen, but she gradually reshaped that débutante image in the 70s both on- and off-camera. A staunch, outspoken feminist with a decisive edge, she went on to take a sizable portion of these contradicting qualities to film and, most particularly, to late 80s TV. The daughter of famed ventriloquist Edgar Bergen and former actress and Chesterfield Girl Frances Bergen, the Beverly Hills born-and-bred Candice was surrounding by Hollywood glitter and glamour from day one. At the age of 6, she made her radio debut on her fathers show. Of extreme privilege, she attended Westlake School for Girls in Los Angeles, the Cathedral School in Washington D.C. and then went abroad to the Montesano (finishing) School in Switzerland. Although she began taking art history and creative drawing at the University of Pennsylvania, she did not graduate due to less-than-stellar grades. In between studies, she also worked as a Ford model in order to buy cameras for her new passion--photography. Her Grace Kelly-like glacial beauty deemed her an ideal candidate for Ivy League patrician roles, and Candice made an auspicious film debut while still a college student portraying the Vassar-styled lesbian member of Sidney Lumets The Group (1966) in an ensemble that included the debuts of other lovely up-and-comers including Joan Hackett and Joanna Pettet. Film offers started coming her way, both here and especially abroad (spurred on by her love for travel). Other than her top-notch roles as the co-ed who comes between Jack Nicholson and Art Garfunkel in Carnal Knowledge (1971) and her prim American lady kidnapped by Moroccan sheik Sean Connery in The Wind and the Lion (1975), her performances were deemed a bit too aloof to really stand out among the crowd.