Barry Bostwick

D.O.B: Feb 24, 1945 |  San Mateo, California, USA

31Credit Score

Tall (6 4), agile, energetic, and ever-so-confident as both actor and singer, especially on the award-winning Broadway stage, Barry Bostwick possesses that certain narcissistic poise, charm and élan that reminds one instantly (and humorously) of a Kevin Kline -- both were quite brilliant in their respective interpretations of The Pirate King in The Pirates of Penzance. Yet, for all his diverse talents (he is a Golden Globe winner and was nominated for the Tony Award three times, winning once), Barry is indelibly caught in a time warp.

Biography

Tall (6 4), agile, energetic, and ever-so-confident as both actor and singer, especially on the award-winning Broadway stage, Barry Bostwick possesses that certain narcissistic poise, charm and élan that reminds one instantly (and humorously) of a Kevin Kline -- both were quite brilliant in their respective interpretations of The Pirate King in The Pirates of Penzance. Yet, for all his diverse talents (he is a Golden Globe winner and was nominated for the Tony Award three times, winning once), Barry is indelibly caught in a time warp. Even today, 35 years after the fact, he is indelibly associated with the role of nerdy hero Brad Majors in the midnight movie phenomena The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975). While it is extremely flattering to be a part of such a cult institution, Barrys acting legacy deserves much more than this. He was born Barry Knapp Bostwick on February 24, 1945, in San Mateo, California, one of two sons of Elizabeth Betty (Defendorf) and Bud Bostwick (Henry Bostwick), a city planner and actor. A student at San Mateo High School, he and his elder brother Peter use to put on musicals and puppet shows for the neighborhood kids. Barry attended San Diegos United States International Universitys School for the Performing Arts in 1967, and switched from music to drama during the course of his studies. He also worked occasionally as a circus performer, which would come in handy on the musical stage down the line. He subsequently moved to New York and attended the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at New York University. Making his stage debut at age 22 in a production of Take Her, Shes Mine, Barry performed in a number of non-musical roles in such productions of War and Peace (1968) and The Misanthrope (1968). Making his 1969 Broadway debut in Cock-a-Doodle Dandy, which ran in tandem with Hamlet in which he was featured as Osric, it was his portrayal of the swaggering, leather jacket-wearing 50s bad boy Danny Zuko in the 1972 Broadway high-school musical smash Grease that put Barrys name prominently and permanently on the marquee signs. Originating the role, he was nominated for a Tony but lost out that year to the older generation (Phil Silvers for A Funny Thing Happened...